Chris Rock Hearts America

I’m sure that everybody has heard of the incredibly racist and offensive tweet that was issued forth from “comedian/actor” Chris Rock:

Happy white peoples independence day the slaves weren’t free but I’m sure they enjoyed fireworks.

This from a man, who in almost any country except the USA, would be washing dishes in the back of some restaurant instead making millions of dollars from those “white peoples” who enjoy his profane and racist “comedy”.

Well, Mr. Rock, slavery was abolished in 1865, 147 years ago.

I guess the race card doen’t have an expiration date…but if that is true, then the United States must have invented the institution of slavery, right?

Not so much… Mr. Rock’s African ancestors were quite busy in the trade prior to the arrival of the Europeans, or so notes Marilyn Hughes Blackmon, Ph.D. of the University of Colorado at Boulder:

Slavery in Africa, the institution of slavery as it existed in Africa, and the effects of world slave-trade systems on African people and societies. As in most of the world, slavery, or involuntary human servitude, was practiced across Africa from prehistoric times to the modern era. When people today think of slavery, many envision the form in which it existed in the United States before the American Civil War (1861-1865): one racially identifiable group owning and exploiting another. However, in other parts of the world, slavery has taken many different forms. In Africa, many societies recognized slaves merely as property, but others saw them as dependents who eventually might be integrated into the families of slave owners. Still other societies allowed slaves to attain positions of military or administrative power. Most often, both slave owners and slaves were black Africans, although they were frequently of different ethnic groups. Traditionally, African slaves were bought to perform menial or domestic labor, to serve as wives or concubines, or to enhance the status of the slave owner.

Traditional African practices of slavery were altered to some extent beginning in the 7th century by two non-African groups of slave traders: Arab Muslims and Europeans. From the 7th to the 20th century, Arab Muslims raided and traded for black African slaves in West, Central, and East Africa, sending thousands of slaves each year to North Africa and parts of Asia. From the 15th to the 19th century, Europeans bought millions of slaves in West, Central, and East Africa and sent them to Europe; the Caribbean; and North, Central, and South America. These two overlapping waves of transcontinental slave trading made the slave trade central to the economies of many African states and threatened many more Africans with enslavement.

II. Traditions of Slavery Within Africa

Slavery existed in some of Africa’s earliest organized societies. More than 3,500 years ago, ancient Egyptians raided neighboring societies for slaves, and the buying and selling of slaves were regular activities in cities along the Nile River. However, whereas the Egyptians left behind written records of their activities, most other early African states and societies did not. Therefore, our understanding of most early African practices of slavery is based on much more recent observations of African traditions regarding slavery and kinship and on oral histories.

Wow, Muslims were part of the slave trade? Who knew? I thought Islam was a pure religion, not like the dirty Christians…I guess the Muslims just have better PR flacks today because we never hear of this heritage…

So when we get into the game of oneupmanship, the question is where do we stop?

There is also the view that the American Indian lived the life of the noble savage  until the Europeans arrived to destroy them. The vision of romantic primitivism that is put forth that they danced and sang and lived in harmony with nature, their existence was pure and divine, is a lie.

Nothing could be farther from the truth.

Native Americans were subject to the whims of nature, a large portion of them lived nomadic lives, their existence dependent upon following the migration of their primary food source. Rather than spending time laying about contemplating the wonders of nature, they occupied themselves with survival, constantly hunting and foraging. If they didn’t work, they didn’t eat.

50 thoughts on “Chris Rock Hearts America

  1. Good Post.
    I know the naysayers will ignore this post as it contravenes their narrative of EVIL AMERICA, so may I add more evidence for them: Illegal, Modern day slavery is still rampant throughout the world; even here in Texas. A friend of mine is an investigator for this organisation: “Mosaic”

    http://www.mosaicservices.org/trafficking/index.php

    What is Human Trafficking?
    Human trafficking is the recruitment, harboring, transporting, or procurement of a person for labor or services for the purpose of involuntary servitude, slavery, or forced commercial sex acts. It is a form of modern day slavery. Human Trafficking includes all aspects of forcing an individual to perform labor or other services. Traffickers use debt bondage, psychological manipulation, threats, and physical violence to control victims. This labor can include sexual services, domestic labor, agriculture or field labor, and factory work. U.S. Department of State estimates that 14,500 to 17,500 persons are brought into the United States each year for labor or sexual exploitation. Due to its economic stability, cultural diversity, major interstates and airports, large number of sexually oriented businesses, and international border, Texas has become a hub for human trafficking. Texas is not only home to major human trafficking corridors, but many individual trafficking victims are brought to the state and forced to work against their will.

  2. Actually, slavery was abolished from the very start of this nation – in all but a few Southern States, that is. I will never understand how it is that some people will enslave a nation to give welfare to a few, then turn and condemn an entire nation for the sins of a few. These people seem to stand the world on its head.

    Besides, this nation corrects its mistakes. Last I looked, there aren’t many others out there doing that – or even acknowledging their mistakes, for that matter.

    Sad…. 😦

  3. If the entire nation is enslaved, then by definition, is it no longer slavery?

    Afterall, the United Nations, wouldn’t have any member states to make up their “Human Rights” Council, would they?

    • It is still slavery. Anytime a person is forced to live counter to conscience (provided that conscience conforms to natural law), it is slavery.

      Those who claim conscience that is opposed to natural law are the would be slave owners/masters.

  4. “They” have attempted to educate “natural law” out of existence and replace it with Statism.

  5. Touchy, touchy, touchy! Chris was referring to the 1st Independence Day, 1776, the slaves weren’t freed for another 90 years. As Don Cheadle said about the tweet, “Who’s the victim of the bigotry in this joke, 18th-century whites?

      • Yes, dear. John Adams, our third president, was among those who 1st suggested that we celebrate the day with loud and dangerous explosive devices.

        • “Yes, dear. John Adams, our third president, was among those who 1st suggested that we celebrate the day with loud and dangerous explosive devices.”

          Not to split hairs Greg, but John Adams was our second president.

            • If your like me, you don’t have enough hair left to mess with.

              I’m down to three … one on the right, one on the left, and one growing right up the middle. 🙂

    • Yes, I’m sure that no offense was intended. I mean, I tell slavery jokes all the time to my black friends and they just think it is hilarious…

      If it wasn’t meant as a negative comment, why even do it?

  6. Tell me about it! If it didn’t run away fast enough, or if it had a hole big enough into which a Black Cat could fit, I would blow it up.

  7. If it wasn’t meant as a negative comment, why even do it?

    Selective outrage strikes again…..

    Because it was a joke, and a funny one.

  8. “This from a man, who in almost any country except the USA, would be washing dishes in the back of some restaurant.”

    Chris Rock is an idiot, but this quote is equally idiotic. Aside from the fact that blacks are the majority in many countries (and there are only so many restaurants with dishes to wash), there are many other countries that are equal to the U.S. in terms of racial mixing/equality. And Rock is popular around the world, even if not in your household or mine.

    • But if Rock was doing comedy in Ethopia, somehow I doubt he would be rich.

      Unless the lucrative Ethopian cinema industry escaped my notice, of course

      • Nice job of picking one country to represent the black world, Utah–and one job to represent the employment options.

  9. James, it may be edgy, but Utah was just being funny with his last comment. Hopefully, the racial content of the comment is meant to mirror the tone of Chris Rock’s remarks, but analyzing humor is no fun, so one unabashed ^5 to Utah

    • Actually, I recognize the humor. The problem in this case is that the joke is being used to deflect attention from the fact that Utah was as wrong with the first comment as Rock was with his. As someone who is often wrong, and who frequently (too frequently, my wife says) uses humor as a common defense mechanism, I get it it–but that doesn’t mean I should excuse it.

        • Not quite–Maher (and Rock, for that matter) are paid to be comedians and to talk about politics. Utah and I aren’t. Maher and apparently do have something in common, though: neither seems capable of admitting any form of error.

          • First – thanks for the honest response. 🙂

            I disagree somewhat with the first … comedian or not, there are boundaries that Maher has certainly crossed, if not legally, certainly morally. Rock, I am not so sure. I seem to hear less about him.

  10. “This from a man, who in almost any country except the USA, would be washing dishes in the back of some restaurant….”

    A sad but interesting comment that could be construed to make people think that your statement could be just as offensive as his.

    “I guess the race card doen’t have an expiration date…but if that is true, then the United States must have invented the institution of slavery, right?”

    No correlation whatsoever between the two. Many people may think that. Many also know better. There was slavery a long time before there was ever a United States but their is evidence of slavery in Europe (non African) prior to the 10th century. Participation has never equaled origination.

    Slavery was a dark time in America’s history. A history that has gone on in sort of shape or form throughout the history of man as far are documented records go. To play the he did it first, second or worst doesn’t excuse it (remember your view on executive privilege). It happened, get over it, and move one. That goes for blacks (Chris Rock) and whites (Utah).

    Chris Rock, I assume, works hard at what he does. He’s fortunate enough to earn a substantial living using “off color” humor that may offend some. It happens. But to ridicule a person by saying that they’d be “washing dishes in the back of some restaurant” is probably just as insulting as the statement he tweeted and pretty much has no merit to base it upon.

    “instead making millions of dollars from those “white peoples” who enjoy his profane and racist “comedy”

    Those white peoples and other races a pay to see his shows of their own free will. He “sells” his product just as a company sells theirs. The content of his show can be criticized but I don’t understand why how he makes his living is. Or is this one of those ” he better be glad….” moments? Does Chris Rock owe anyone anything for taking advantage of the opportunities this country presents and benefiting from it? Wait, before you say it, you’ll refer me back to your “in almost any other country” statement. I get it.

    That’s the beauty of living in America. We are free to criticize and respond to the criticism. But it neither makes you better than him nor him better than you.

    • I usually don’t comment just to agree with someone, William, but this is very well said.

    • William:

      Ethopia was an illustration of absurdity, as was the dish washing crack – I could have used brick mason, mechanic, carpenter (all jobs that I personally have held) and any nation in south Asia. There are many countries where comedy and thespian pursuits are looked upon as careers for those lacking seriousness because there is just no practical use for the skill, certainly not worth millions of dollars.

      I know that you are black as are many of our readers but to think that a black man in almost any other region of the world could make it the way black stars have in Hollywood or in the business of American sports is asinine.

      I can pretty much guarantee that my beginnings were every bit as humble as Rock’s was and yet somehow, I don’t find his comments funny or cool.

      I have to look upon calls to “get over it” with a jaundiced eye – especially when I didn’t bring the subject up in the first place. Just for the record, I feel the same way about the “reconquista” effort in the Southwest.

      • I never said I agreed with his comments. Only that he has a right to make them no matter that you may feel offended. With that right, comes with your right to criticize them. I also find it just as asinine that you would think the “dishwasher in the back..” comment would go without criticism. I doubt you did. You left yourself wide open for that one. Something you don’t usually do. That gaffe could kill you in a political campaign.

        The comment to “get over it” comes on the heels of whites telling blacks to “get over it” when some blame slavery or whites for their shortcomings. There are more opportunities in America today then there has ever been. No more excuses. We should all get over it and quit blaming each other for our own issues and failures.

        “I know that you are black as are many of our readers but to think that a black man in almost any other region of the world could make it the way black stars have in Hollywood or in the business of American sports is asinine.”

        Whoa. I won’t even speculate to what you mean by that statement. But in rebuttal, there was a time that Harlem was bigger than Hollywood with a lot of blacks making a lot of money. It was ok for blacks to perform (Count Basie, Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington) in the hotels in South Beach but they couldn’t stay there or eat in the restaurants. So they took there money across the bridge to black communities. Look at what Overtown and Liberty City were in Miami before it was decided that we needed I-95 to run right through the middle of it. Why? That area was thriving. Who made that decision? Hint, not blacks.

        Acting and athletics are big businesses. They generate billions of dollars. There are many black athletes making a lot of money for many white team owners. Just like the good old days, huh?

        That was a joke. May be in poor taste but still a joke.

        • “I doubt you did. You left yourself wide open for that one.”

          And never miss an opportunity to slam a conservative I see. Fun to poke at a political party, as long as it is not yours … right Gates? 🙂

          • I never “slam” anyone. I mean utah usually posts very clearly so that his words can’t be misconstrued. If you weren’t in such a hurry to defend something/someone that didn’t/doesn’t need defending, you wouldn’t have misconstrued mine.

            Sorry but I don’t play the political party game and I don’t see where I even mentioned a political party. I consider utah a man and a person not a conservative. Read again with an open mind.

            The choir only needs to sing when directed.

              • Well if you could just show me where I mentioned anything about a political party then you wouldn’t have to be demonized.

  11. To think that a WHITE man in almost any other region of the world could make it the way white stars have in Hollywood or in the business of American sports also would be asinine, right? Many other regions have black stars, even if they don’t make as much money as they do in the U.S.

    • Nah – black, white, green, or blue, I don’t like Chris Rock. In the interest of equal dislike, I never like Andrew Dice Clay either. Not very far apart “comedy wise”.

        • uh – no. I didn’t watch the link. I said, “I don’t like Chris Rock.” I don’t like liver either, and won’t try it even if someone tells me how good it is or how great their mother can fix it.

      • Agreed. I was just showing the view from the other side of the porch which I thought was the purpose of these blogs.

  12. Found this on Thomas Jefferson this evening:
    “While president, Jefferson’s principles were tested in many ways. For example, in order to purchase the Louisiana Territory from France he was willing to expand his narrow interpretation of the Constitution. But Jefferson stood firm in ending the importation of slaves and maintaining his view of the separation of church and state. In the end, Jefferson completed two full and eventful terms as president. He also paved the way for James Madison and James Monroe, his political protégés, to succeed him in the presidency.”
    http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/jefferson/jefffed.html

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